The Hayes Family History Site

Including Members Of The Hayes, Tierney, Lewis, Beattie, Sheehan, Yerks, Condos, Smith and Other Families

Archive for the 'Bio’s' Category

JEREMIAH D SHEEHAN & FAMILY

Jeremiah D Sheehan was born March 17, 1827 in County Kerry, Ireland.  According to immigration records Jeremiah arrived in Boston on June 7, 1846 and applied for naturalization on January 18, 1859.  He was married to Mary Sullivan, who was born circa 1829 in Ireland. There is no indication as to whether they were married before or after his immigration to America, although “after” seems more likely.

Around 1860, Jeremiah had moved his family from the outskirts of Manchester into the main city.  Over the next few decades, they lived in several houses in Manchester.

  • 1860:  6 Johnson’s Block
  • 1864 – 1866:   4 Mitchell’s Block
  • 1871 – 1875:  5 Merrimack (opposite the square)
  • 1873:  Rear of 44 Merrimack
  • 1875:   62 Auburn Street, Manchester, NH
  • 1877 – 1886:   62 Auburn Street, Manchester, NH
  • 1886 – 1891:  186 Auburn Street, Manchester, NH

Jeremiah D Sheehan was a proud member of several New Hampshire Volunteer Regiments during the civil war. He enlisted as a Private on 25 July 1861 at the age of 38.  His grave proudly indicates that he was a member of Co. K of the10th Regiment of the New Hampshire Volunteers. His Civil War history is as follows:

  • Enlisted in Company C, 3rd Infantry Regiment New Hampshire on 23 Aug 1861.
  • Received a disability discharge from Company C, 3rd Infantry Regiment New Hampshire on 19 Oct 1861 at Annapolis, MD.
  • Enlisted in Company K, 10th Infantry Regiment New Hampshire on 5 Sep 1862.
  • Received a disability discharge from Company K, 10th Infantry Regiment New Hampshire on 28 Apr 1863.
  • Enlisted in Company C, 11th Regiment U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps on 4 Jan 1864.
  • Received a final disability discharge from Company C, 11th Regiment U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps on 2 Dec 1864 at Point Lookout, MD.

In August of 1870, Jeremiah was treated at the U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in Kennebec, Maine for his hernia that he developed during the Civil War.  It is not known how long he remained there.

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Source: Genealogical and Family History of Southern New York and the Hudson River Valley”, volume III

Nathaniel, son of John, was born about 1808, Somers, Westchester County, New York and resided in the town of New Castle, where he was a successful farmer, and died at the age of 18 years. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and a Democrat in political allegiance. He married Sarah Ann Weeks, born in the town of Somers, daughter of William and Rachel Weeks, representatives of old Westchester families, and she like himself was a faithful member of the Methodist church, and died at the age of 70 years. They were the parents of nine children: John, died at the age of 21 years; Cornelius, lived in Mount Kisco; Anna, wife of unknown Ferguson, resided in the same place; Cyrus, lived in goldens Bridge, Westchester County, New York; George Washington, lived in Dutchess County, New York; Stephen; Julia; Nathaniel, mentioned below; Araminta, died at the age of 19 years. Three of the sons were Union soldiers in the Civil War, participating in many battles. They were Cyrus, George W. And Nathaniel, all members of the Fifth New York heavy artillery, the second being a sergeant.

Nathaniel, six son of Nathaniel and Sarah A (Weeks) Cutler, was born December 21, 1844, in New Castle. He grew to manhood on the paternal farm, aiding in its labors and attending the local schools. He was still a minor when he entered the military service in the Civil War, and was stationed most of the time in Virginia, being honorably discharged at Harpers Ferry. He attained the rank of Corporal in Company H, Fifth New York Heavy Artillery, under Col. Graham, and participated in all the battles of the Shenandoah campaign under Gen. Sheridan. He resided for many years upon a farm of 72 acres in New Castle, most of which was under a high state of cultivation, having an orchard of 6 acres and excellent buildings, affording an ideal rural home.  It is located 2 miles from Mount Kisco. Mr. Cutler is a charter member of the Stewart Hart Post, Grand Army of the Republic, of Mount Kisco. He has been identified all his life with the Republican Party in politics. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, a public spirited and enterprising citizen, and has given warm support to all those offices calculated to advance the morale, intellectual or material welfare of the community in which he lived. He now resides with his elder son in Fallsburg, New York.

He married, December 28, 1870, Martha Ida Sutton, born, reared and educated at Claverack, Columbia County, New York and and represents an old and well-known family. Nathaniel Cutler and his wife have two sons: Walter S, mentioned below; William Edward, a farmer, and owner of 200 acres of land in Liberty, Sullivan County; he married, in 1901, at Mount Vernon.  Katherine Gettle, of Mount Vernon, New York, and they have two children: Madeline and Claire. Mrs. Cutler is descended from Joseph Sutton, a member of the society of friends, who came from Southern Court, England, and settled in Westchester County, New York, accompanied by his brother John. James, son of Joseph Sutton, was born in a log cabin on the paternal homestead in Westchester, and was the father of Walter Sutton, born in the same place, whose son, James T Sutton, was also born in the same place; he was a farmer by occupation, an active supporter of Democratic policies and died at the age of 79 years old. On reaching manhood he married his second cousin, Phebe, a member of the Society of Friends, who died at the age of 79 years, daughter of William Sutton, a son of Joseph Sutton, the pioneer. William Sutton married Charlotte Hunt, a daughter of Josiah and Lydia (Palmer) Hunt, who bore blood relation to Lord Effingham, of England. Their son, Joseph T Sutton, was the father of Martha Ida, wife of Nathaniel Cutler, and of William Edward Sutton, who lived in Seattle Washington, and was reared and educated in Westchester County, where he was for sometime a successful teacher and settled in the middle of his life in the West.  He married Emma, daughter of Benjamin Acker.

Walter Sutton, son of McDaniel and Martha I (Sutton) Cutler, was born February 5, 1874, in Peekskill, New York, where he grew to manhood. He was educated at Mount Kisco High School, where he graduated in 1892, and subsequently in engaged in surveying and civil engineering in Westchester County. In 1902 he removed to Liberty, Sullivan County, New York, where for eight years he was a lumber merchant.  In 1910, he removed to Fallsburg, and purchased a flour and grain business which he is conducting with gratifying success. Mr. Cutler is a charter member of Liberty Lodge, No. 728, Knights of the Maccabees, and is a member of the Society of Friends. He married in Liberty, December 27, 1900, Harriet E Major, born July 28, 1880, in Mount Vernon, New York, daughter of Gustav and Harriet (Ely) Major of that town. Mr. Major was a contracting carpenter and builder in Mount Vernon and an active participant in public affairs. He had children: Esther, Harriet E, Emily, Carrie and Gertrude. Children of Walter S Cutler: Dorothy, Roy, Florence; all students of the public school.

I recently received a packet of information about Patrick Hanley from the New York Police Department.  Patrolman Patrick S Hanley was appointed to the New York City Police Department on April 3, 1890 and was issued Patrolman Shield number 4866.

According to Patrick Hanley’s Police Department “Transfer and Assignment Card”, Patrick was born in Ireland on 9 September 1865.  But according to an Irish birth record I found, he was actually born on  the thirteenth of September in the Garryfine / Rockhill area of Limerick County.  He was Naturalized in Brooklyn Court in 1886.  His former occupation was “Laborer” and he lived at 400 Prospect Avenue in Brooklyn. This was just five blocks from his sister, Catherine Hanley Lewis, who was living at 493 13th Street in Brooklyn in 1900.

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The following is a biography of Nathaniel Cutler Sr. (b. 1 Jan 1808, d. 12 Apr 1886).  Nathaniel is Colleen Yerks’ great x4 grandfather .  He lived in Mount Kisco, New York for most of his life, but may have been born in North Castle. He married Sally Ann Weeks in 1829 and had several children.

John Cutler 1828 – 1850
Cornelius Cutler 1833 –
Amy Cutler 1834 –
Cyrus Cutler 1836 – 1918
George Washington Cutler 1836 –
Araminta Cutler 1838 – 1855
Julia Cutler 1842 –
Stephen Cutler 1842 – 1865
Nathaniel Cutler 1844 –

According to the recently discovered bio, I have learned that his father was John Cutler and comes from old Westchester County stock. The Cutlers apparently are of English origin.  Nathaniel is buried at the St Marks Episcopal Church Yard in Mount Kisco with his wife. I have been there many times.

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Colleen’s great, great grandmother Giaele (Jean) Bottomly was born in Rivarolo Mantovano, Italy on December 28, 1870.   Rivarolo Mantovano is a commune (municipality) in the Province of Mantua in the northern Italian region Lombardy, located about 110 km southeast of Milan and about 30 km southwest of Mantua.

The Baroni Route To America

A= Rivarolo Mantovano, Italy     B = Lugano, Switzerland
c= Le Havre, France

Giaele married  Angelo Baroni around 1896 and had three children; Michael A (b. Mar 1897), Marie (b. 14 May 1898) and Jean B. (b. 7 May 1900).  At some point, the Baroni family moved from Italy  to Lugano, Switzerland, which is just over the Italian border, north of Milano, Italy.

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Chief Quartermaster William Andrew Flaherty

Chief Quartermaster William Andrew Flaherty, a cousin on the Roche (Roach) branch of our family tree gave his life in 1944 while serving in the US Navy. William was born in Port Chester, New York and is the son of David and Mae Flaherty.  He was assigned to the Scorpion, the fifth submarine to bear that name.  The Scorpion was laid down on 20 March 1942 at the Portsmouth (N.H.) Navy Yard; launched on 20 July 1942; sponsored by Miss Elizabeth T. Monagle; and commissioned on 1 October 1942, Lt. Comdr. W. N. Wylie in command.

Departing Pearl Harbor on 29 December 1943, Scorpion (Commander M. G. Schmidt) stopped at Midway to top off with fuel, and left that place on 3 January 1944 to conduct her fourth war patrol. Her assigned area was in the northern East China and Yellow Seas.

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I found this interesting video on Cousin Jim.

A lifelong Republican, Jim has had a long and successful career in magazine publishing, including Fortune. A traditional conservative believing in small government and fiscal responsibility, Jim has also been deeply concerned about the deep polarization in America over the last couple years even as the problems we face grow in severity. Obama’s promise to work toward national unity appealed to Jim as well as his belief that the route to economic prosperity starts with building a strong middle class.

This last couple of weeks has been very exciting for us. First, I found an obituary for 101 year old Angela Beattie Hughes who died on December 29, 2001. Angela is the daughter of John Beattie, who is the son of my Great Great grandfather. The obituary gave the names of her daughters and the names of four of her grand-children. Armed with the names and the fact that the funeral took place in Garden City, NY, I was quickly able to google some potential addresses for at least a few of the people named.

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Lloyd W. Lewis (b. 1928 d. 2000)  was my very special and wise Uncle. We shared the same birthday and my middle name was given to me in honor of him. I, in turn, have passed my full name on to my first born in honor of him.  I regret not spending more time with him in my younger years, but he did leave an ever-lasting impression on me and many others.  This video  demonstrates the impact Lloyd had on some of those people.
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Several weeks ago I visited the final resting place of Mary Tierney, my Great-Great Grandmother.  After receiving her Death Certificate from the New York City Archives, I was able to determine that she was buried at Calvary Cemetery in Queens, New York. Unfortunately when I arrived, I found her plot, but there was no gravestone.  I was hoping that there would be a gravestone with markings to fill me in on some missing pieces of the Tierney clan puzzle.

So in desperation, I requested an Internment report from Calvary Cemetery.  It was a bit expensive, but I think well worth it. Much to my surprise, I received it in just two weeks time. So, the Internment report solved several Tierney mysteries for me.

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