The Hayes Family History Site

Including Members Of The Hayes, Tierney, Lewis, Beattie, Sheehan, Yerks, Condos, Smith and Other Families

Archive for the 'Surname: Lewis' Category

I recently received a packet of information about Patrick Hanley from the New York Police Department.  Patrolman Patrick S Hanley was appointed to the New York City Police Department on April 3, 1890 and was issued Patrolman Shield number 4866.

According to Patrick Hanley’s Police Department “Transfer and Assignment Card”, Patrick was born in Ireland on 9 September 1865.  But according to an Irish birth record I found, he was actually born on  the thirteenth of September in the Garryfine / Rockhill area of Limerick County.  He was Naturalized in Brooklyn Court in 1886.  His former occupation was “Laborer” and he lived at 400 Prospect Avenue in Brooklyn. This was just five blocks from his sister, Catherine Hanley Lewis, who was living at 493 13th Street in Brooklyn in 1900.

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Note: The following Hayes Family Genealogy Treasure was found by Jerry Hayes, grandson of Harry and Isabelle Lewis.  His write up about it first appeared in his personal blog, “Finding A Voice For My Thoughts” on March 26, 2011.

Grandpa's Anniversary Letter

In one or two other posts here I have mentioned this box of stuff I found in the basement that was full of treasures from my youth. I was down in the basement again today and took a look through that box again and found the letter my Grandpa & Grandma wrote to me and my brothers on the occasion of their 50th wedding anniversary. It was written on a typewriter (so very typically Grandpa) and I scanned it but I’ve also transcribed it here:

Anniversary

October 4

1922-1972

Dear Jerry Peter & Philip

In view of our approaching 50th wedding anniversary and since you are a member of our family, we are asking you to bear with us for a few minutes while we hold forth on the well-worn subject of “Time”. It intrigues us just now because we are especially aware that we have used up quite a bit of it, possibly not in all respects in the best way, but perhaps in just about the way our limited talents permitted us.

We wish that our past fifty years had been full of noble or notable accomplishment. But only a few people seem to have been that able or fortunate. We have tried with considerable success to enjoy our lives together and to do well in establishing a family. We are happy about the results.

The passing of Time has been celebrated, regretted, recorded, and otherwise treated with great and enduring interest since Time began. In fact, we would not have Time if it did not pass. It never stood still despite fairy tales to the contrary. Without Time, we do not exist. Imagine anything existing before Time began-or after it ended!

Man has always been concerned with Time, for example, the time taken by the Earth to rotate on its axis and its orbit, the time taken by the Earth to evolve from its probable beginning, the time taken by man to become what he is, and the time between events in history.

Time engages man continuously from his birth to his death, from the rising to the setting of the sun and the beginning to the end of his undertakings, Time has been a favorite of poets who have mentioned its wing and its habit of fleeting, its capacity for being wasted, it ravages, its corridors, it footprints, its value, it healing, and humorously, what the Walrus said about it in “Alice”.

Our concern with Time is all of this and more but our special concern just now is the fact that fifty years of it have been enjoyed in our happy marriage. We are celebrating this happiness by giving a token like the enclosed to each member of our family. Please use it and enjoy it.

We hope that none of you will send us any gift in return since we have more possessions that we can manage.

Thank you for scores of happy incidents in our lives!

And remember us with the same love we send you!

Grandma & Grandpa

I just have to smile at how Grandpa is talking about Physics and Time. Gee I guess the nut, this nut, didn’t fall from from that tree. Did it?

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On Sunday, May 19, 1897, the published an article titled “Saw Lincoln Shot”. In it, was an interview of Henry William Lewis, age 62, and the great, great grandfather of Philip Hayes Sr. Henry Lewis told The Sun the reporter of two very interesting stories related to the civil war.  Below is a copy of the article.

SAW LINCOLN SHOT

H.W. LEWIS WAS AT FORD”S THEATRE ON THE FATAL NIGHT

He Was In The Gallery When He Heard The Shot Fired And Saw Lincoln’s Head Drop — The Great Commotion That Followed —  Size Of The Audience — The First Shot In The War

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Today, I found another true treasure in my Moms keepsakes. This one comes to us from Ada Hunter of  Swansea, Wales. According to a note written by my grandfather on the envelope protecting the postcard, he received the card from his first cousin, once removed circa 1897.  That would make my grandfather just 5 years old, so I suspect that it may actually be closer to 1900.


Click to Enlarge

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Below is an interesting newspaper article that has been framed and displayed in my Moms house for a very long time. She has always told me that she cut it out of a newspaper because of the last name and location, but did not think it was related to anybody in our family.

Today I asked her about it in depth and took it home (with her permission) for further evaluation. She remembers cutting it out of a newspaper around 1970-1980.

So I did some research and found that the article was actually published in 1951, much earlier than when she remembers cutting it out. My Mom would have been only 25 years old when it was printed. It would not be likely that she had ANY interest in something like that at 25. Even she admits that.

Now… I am thinking that is is possible that she cut it out of the newspaper that was given to her by  family member years after it was published and had it framed. Could my Mom be confused concerning the events of her acquiring the article? Could David Henry Lewis be related?  Or could this just be a true trick of the mind who has had to remember so much.

Research indicates that David Henry Lewis died 25 Dec 1950.

I was recently contacted by Peter Aubrey-Smith.  He is my third cousin, once removed on the Lewis branch of my family tree.  He had seen my research on ancestry.com and decided to contact me.  We have since been sharing information back and forth, but the grand prize came the other day when he shared with me a portrait picture of a woman that his family firmly believes is Jane Lewis.

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Lloyd Lewis, 71, of Glen Mills, who for 19 years worked to improve the living conditions of senior citizens, died Thursday from pneumonia after treatment for acute leukemia.

In 1971, Mr. Lewis began his work with the elderly when he became founding executive director of the Kendal Organization in Kennett Square and established Kendal at Longwood, the first of the Kendal nonprofit life-care retirement communities.

Before that, Mr. Lewis worked at the Vanadium Corp. of America in New York for 11 years; the American Friends Service Committee in Philadelphia for about two years; and Pendle Hill, a Quaker adult-education center in Wallingford, for 11 years.

But it was his work at Kendal that inspired Mr. Lewis to devote the rest of his life to serving senior citizens. At the time of his retirement from Kendal six years ago, an estimated 2,000 seniors lived in Kendal properties in Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York and New Hampshire.

Mr. Lewis worked to improve the living conditions of seniors nationwide with the restraint elimination program, called Untie the Elderly, and led the effort by eliminating restraints from all Kendal facilities.

After retiring from Kendal, Mr. Lewis established a new company, US Retirement Communities, where he worked until last year.

He was active in the Pennsylvania Association of Nonprofit Homes for the Aging and the American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging, where he served on the executive board, its continuing care committee and its public policy committee

Mr. Lewis also served on the American Gerontological Society, the Committee on Aging of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends, and Friends Services for the Aging in Philadelphia.

In addition, he served on the board of Swarthmore College, where he earned a bachelor of arts degree in 1949, from 1985 to 1989 and again in 1990 until his death.

He was a bird-watcher and was a member of the Society of Friends.

Mr. Lewis is survived by his wife of 49 years, Eliza B. Lewis of Glen Mills; son Paul M. Lewis and daughter Laurie K. Lewis, both of West Chester; a sister; and two grandchildren.

Services are private. The family suggests contributions to either Swarthmore College or the Cape May Bird Observation Center for Research and Education, Cape May Court House, N.J.

Today we celebrated Jeanne Lewis Hayes’ 84th birthday. Knowing that Mom is not the biggest fan of birthdays and birthday cakes, I think you will enjoy this one.  The children are Philip, Kevin, Ann and Kelly Hayes.

We know that Anna Roach (b.abt 1838 in ireland) immigrated to and lived in New York City. She married Henry Lewis of Wales. Her mother lived with her for a while in the 1860′s, carefully caring for Thomas, Anna’s newborn 4 lbs. son and my great grandfather, by “putting him in a little cigar box on one of those old-fashioned shelves.”

I have been deeply curious about the Roach’s because of the mis-spelling of her last name on Anna’s grave. Initially, I though the grave was correct and that the Census record keepers were just sloppy. But as I collected various death records, I became convinced that “Roach” is the proper spelling of her last name.

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Lloyd W. Lewis (b. 1928 d. 2000)  was my very special and wise Uncle. We shared the same birthday and my middle name was given to me in honor of him. I, in turn, have passed my full name on to my first born in honor of him.  I regret not spending more time with him in my younger years, but he did leave an ever-lasting impression on me and many others.  This video  demonstrates the impact Lloyd had on some of those people.
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