The Hayes Family History Site

Including Members Of The Hayes, Tierney, Lewis, Beattie, Sheehan, Yerks, Condos, Smith and Other Families

Archive for the 'Surname: Hayes' Category

JEREMIAH D SHEEHAN & FAMILY

Jeremiah D Sheehan was born March 17, 1827 in County Kerry, Ireland.  According to immigration records Jeremiah arrived in Boston on June 7, 1846 and applied for naturalization on January 18, 1859.  He was married to Mary Sullivan, who was born circa 1829 in Ireland. There is no indication as to whether they were married before or after his immigration to America, although “after” seems more likely.

Around 1860, Jeremiah had moved his family from the outskirts of Manchester into the main city.  Over the next few decades, they lived in several houses in Manchester.

  • 1860:  6 Johnson’s Block
  • 1864 – 1866:   4 Mitchell’s Block
  • 1871 – 1875:  5 Merrimack (opposite the square)
  • 1873:  Rear of 44 Merrimack
  • 1875:   62 Auburn Street, Manchester, NH
  • 1877 – 1886:   62 Auburn Street, Manchester, NH
  • 1886 – 1891:  186 Auburn Street, Manchester, NH

Jeremiah D Sheehan was a proud member of several New Hampshire Volunteer Regiments during the civil war. He enlisted as a Private on 25 July 1861 at the age of 38.  His grave proudly indicates that he was a member of Co. K of the10th Regiment of the New Hampshire Volunteers. His Civil War history is as follows:

  • Enlisted in Company C, 3rd Infantry Regiment New Hampshire on 23 Aug 1861.
  • Received a disability discharge from Company C, 3rd Infantry Regiment New Hampshire on 19 Oct 1861 at Annapolis, MD.
  • Enlisted in Company K, 10th Infantry Regiment New Hampshire on 5 Sep 1862.
  • Received a disability discharge from Company K, 10th Infantry Regiment New Hampshire on 28 Apr 1863.
  • Enlisted in Company C, 11th Regiment U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps on 4 Jan 1864.
  • Received a final disability discharge from Company C, 11th Regiment U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps on 2 Dec 1864 at Point Lookout, MD.

In August of 1870, Jeremiah was treated at the U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in Kennebec, Maine for his hernia that he developed during the Civil War.  It is not known how long he remained there.

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Abt. Tuesday, September 8th, 1906
Either, Manchester Union or The Ledger

Unconscious At His Post

John J Hayes Was Stricken With Apoplexy and Died

John J Hayes, a nightwatchman in the stocking mill in Amoskeag was found unconscious in the mill at 1 o’clock Monday morning, and died at 9 o’clock. The cause of the death was an apoplectic shock. Mr. Hayes was as well as ever on Sunday. He attended church as usual, at St. Patrick’s, and went to his work, apparently in good health.

Mr. Hayes was formally one of the most popular men of the South End. He was a graduate of the old Park Street school, and Bryant & Stratton Business College, and years ago was a principal of a night school.

He was a native of England and was 54 years of age. He lived at 35 Front St., Amoskeag. Mrs. Hayes survives him, and other survivors are a son, Jeremiah Hayes; and a daughter, Jenny Hayes, both of this city.

 

John J Hayes Found Unconscious

Thursday, May 10, 1906
Manchester Union
Page 4

John J Hayes

The funeral service of John J Hayes was held at St. Patrick’s Church on Wednesday morning, the Rev. Father Matthew Kramer celebrating a high mass of Requiem at 830 o’clock, assisted by the church choir. Interment was at St. Joseph’s Cemetery, where Father Creamer read the last prayers. Kean & Sheehan were the undertakers. J Arthur Kennedy was the Funeral Director, and the pallbearers were Patrick J Flynn, William J Kennedy, Michael Connor, Thomas Fahey and John F Sullivan.

In attendance from out of town were Mr. and Mrs. H A Fenner, Ms. Jenny Kelty and Mrs. Margaret Flynn of Providence Rhode Island; William H Hickey of Boston, and Mr. and Mrs. RH Hickey of Fitchburg, Mass.

The flowers were as follows: Pillow “Papa.” family; wreath of galax, Bert and Ella Tenner of Providence, R. I.; Standing wreath, “sleep” on base, Mr. and Mrs. John F Sullivan; standing crescent, “John,” an old-time friend, P J. Flynn; crescent, Joseph J Hayes; pinks, Walter S Holt; cut flowers, neighbors; pinks, William Burke and family; pinks, S. L. Flanders and family; standing cross, “rest,” and pinks, Manchester Stocking Company; pinks, Henry Dinnan and family; pinks, Nelllie Kilty; spiritual bouquet, Minnie McCarthy.

 

John J Hayes Obituary

Note: The following Hayes Family Genealogy Treasure was found by Jerry Hayes, grandson of Harry and Isabelle Lewis.  His write up about it first appeared in his personal blog, “Finding A Voice For My Thoughts” on March 26, 2011.

Grandpa's Anniversary Letter

In one or two other posts here I have mentioned this box of stuff I found in the basement that was full of treasures from my youth. I was down in the basement again today and took a look through that box again and found the letter my Grandpa & Grandma wrote to me and my brothers on the occasion of their 50th wedding anniversary. It was written on a typewriter (so very typically Grandpa) and I scanned it but I’ve also transcribed it here:

Anniversary

October 4

1922-1972

Dear Jerry Peter & Philip

In view of our approaching 50th wedding anniversary and since you are a member of our family, we are asking you to bear with us for a few minutes while we hold forth on the well-worn subject of “Time”. It intrigues us just now because we are especially aware that we have used up quite a bit of it, possibly not in all respects in the best way, but perhaps in just about the way our limited talents permitted us.

We wish that our past fifty years had been full of noble or notable accomplishment. But only a few people seem to have been that able or fortunate. We have tried with considerable success to enjoy our lives together and to do well in establishing a family. We are happy about the results.

The passing of Time has been celebrated, regretted, recorded, and otherwise treated with great and enduring interest since Time began. In fact, we would not have Time if it did not pass. It never stood still despite fairy tales to the contrary. Without Time, we do not exist. Imagine anything existing before Time began-or after it ended!

Man has always been concerned with Time, for example, the time taken by the Earth to rotate on its axis and its orbit, the time taken by the Earth to evolve from its probable beginning, the time taken by man to become what he is, and the time between events in history.

Time engages man continuously from his birth to his death, from the rising to the setting of the sun and the beginning to the end of his undertakings, Time has been a favorite of poets who have mentioned its wing and its habit of fleeting, its capacity for being wasted, it ravages, its corridors, it footprints, its value, it healing, and humorously, what the Walrus said about it in “Alice”.

Our concern with Time is all of this and more but our special concern just now is the fact that fifty years of it have been enjoyed in our happy marriage. We are celebrating this happiness by giving a token like the enclosed to each member of our family. Please use it and enjoy it.

We hope that none of you will send us any gift in return since we have more possessions that we can manage.

Thank you for scores of happy incidents in our lives!

And remember us with the same love we send you!

Grandma & Grandpa

I just have to smile at how Grandpa is talking about Physics and Time. Gee I guess the nut, this nut, didn’t fall from from that tree. Did it?

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This is a story that Philip Jr. wrote (and Daddy typed) for a school project.

The Speedy Little Munchkin

By Philip L Hayes Jr., age 8

My Cousin Ann was over to my house for a sleep over. After a long day of playing, we fell quickly to sleep.

(Poke. Poke) Stop. (Poke, Poke) Stop it Ann, I said. Much to my surprise, I poked a leprechaun in the eye. (Poke, Poke).  “What?  A leprechaun?” I rolled off the bed and crushed the leprechaun who was sitting on the floor.  I got up off the floor and saw the leprechaun in his real form. The leprechaun had a smile upon his face.  He has  a black belt in Karate., but his suit is as green as grass.  The leprechaun said “play”.  “Alright” I said. “Let me get dressed and eat breakfast”.  I put on my blue jeans and got my red shirt on that had “Go Yankees” printed on it.  I went downstairs to the kitchen and split my pistachio muffin with the leprechaun. “I will name you ‘Hamburger’”, I said.  “Hamburger… do you want to play hide and seek?”  He is as small as a kitten, so he was hard to find as he ran around in the kitchen.

#$%&# CRASH #$%&#

A frying pan hit him in his head as he crawled around in the kitchen cabinets. I could see that he had stars circling his head.  I went over to him and said, “Lets not play that game again”.

“What is that noise?” Ann said as she came down the stairs a bit groggy and scared.  My leprechaun, Hamburger, said, “Play”.  Ann was shocked as she looked at the leprechaun. “Play” he said again.  “Yes, lets play chase the cat” I said.   The leprechaun had to be the cat, because he was the size of a kitten and was as fast as a speeding bullet.   He was so fast that Ann and I decided to make a trap to catch the speedy little munchkin.   We put a dollar under a box that was propped up with a stick that had a string attached to it.  When he went to grab the dollar, we pulled the string and the box fell over the speedy little munchkin. He was caught.

We removed the box from over our friend and there he stood, holding the dollar in front of his face.  We then asked him to take us to his pot of gold.  He said… “OK, but it is very dangerous”.  He gave us a shield and a bronze sword.  We set off in search of the pot of gold.  After a couple of miles we came across a fire-breathing dragon.   I swung my sword furiously and cut of his three heads.  I said “Yahoo!”.   Then a bird came down and started pecking me in the head.  I screamed in pain and started swing swinging my sword at the bird. The bird picked me up by my shirt as Ann and Hamburger held on tightly to me.  He flew us all the way to the pot of gold.

The Leprechaun said, “You passed my test. You earned the pot of gold.  Good work!”  Ann and I decided to take only half of the pot of gold, leaving the rest for our friend.  But our friend said that he wanted us to take it all, because he was going to stay with us for now on.  Hamburger told the bird to pick us up and bring us back home. And so he did.

The end.

TAUNTON–Andrea M. (Hayes) Brady, 84 years old, died on Saturday morning January 8, 2011 in Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston after becoming ill on Christmas Day. Born in Manchester, NH, daughter of the late Jeremiah and Margaret (Sheehan) Hayes. Andrea was a graduate of Mt. Saint Charles School in Providence. For a few years after her marriage she worked as a secretary for the former Balfour, Co in Attleboro, but was primarily a housewife and mother. She enjoyed cooking and making desserts for her family. She is the wife of Donald Brady of Taunton and the mother of Patty Hogan and her husband Brian of Raynham. Andrea is the grandmother of Ashley and Kevin Hogan of Raynham. She was sister of the late John Hayes and is the sister in law of Jeanne Hayes of NY and John “Jack” Brady and his wife Joyce of Taunton. Andrea is the aunt of Jerry, Philip =and Peter Hayes, Peter Bourgeois and John Brady,Jr.

Funeral Information

Relatives and friends are invited to attend a Funeral from the Crapo-Hathaway Funeral Home, 350 Somerset Ave,.( Route 138 South) Taunton on Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2011 at 9AM followed by a Mass of Christian Burial in St. Ann’s Church, Raynham, at 10AM. Visiting hours on Tuesday from 6-8PM. Interment St Joseph’s Cemetery.

This the the marraige certificate for Harry McNeill & Jane Josephine Hayes.  They were married at St Patricks Roman Catholic Church in Manchester, New Hampshire on September 27th, 1920.

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Ann Hayes’ stamp art (8 years old) has been selected to be on display in the Winter Wonderland Gallery. She is part of a contest and she needs your vote.

Ann Hayes Christmas Art

There have been thousands of pieces of artwork submitted and hers was chosen from entries from around the country. You can vote every twenty four hours if you want.

There are prizes for the student who receives the most votes in December.

Click the link below to view all the contestants art and to vote for your favorite.

https://www.artstamps.com/collectibles.php?page=2

Merry Christmas!!

Maryland special appeals judge and ocean mariner extraordinaire, Ridgely Melvin died at his Annapolis residence on Oct. 11, 1999. Ridge was born and lived almost his entire life at Melvin Point, overlooking the Chesapeake Bay’s South River. He came to Princeton from Alexandra, Va., Episcopal H.S., majored in politics, and was a member of Cap and Gown. He was on the freshman and jayvee swimming teams, played end on our championship 150-lb. football teams, and was active in the Yacht Club. During WWII Ridge served as an officer aboard the battleship Washington in the Pacific naval campaigns. As a devoted yachtsman from childhood, Ridge raced in a variety of classes and won the Triton Class Natl. Championship in the early 1970s. In 1985 he and wife Lucy sailed their sloop Song across the Atlantic. For the next eight years they lived aboard while sailing through European and Mediterranean waters.

Ridge’s law career was distinguished both as a judge and trial lawyer. He was a member of the three-judge panel that disbarred V.P. Agnew for “deceitful and dishonest conduct” and found him unfit as a member of the Maryland bar.

The class extends its sympathy to Ridge’s entire family including his sister, Elizabeth, widow of Don Patterson. We will miss Ridge.

The Class of 1940

Elizabeth Sommerville Melvin Patterson, 80, a five-year resident of the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson and a lifelong resident of Annapolis, died July 24 at Sentara Virginia Beach General Hospital in Virginia. Known as “Libby” and “Nanny,” Mrs. Patterson was born Feb. 10, 1923, in Annapolis, the daughter of the late Judge Ridgely P. and Augusta Burwell Melvin.

A homemaker, she loved to travel and read, and was a member of St. Anne’s Parish and the Hamilton Street Club. Her husband of 55 years, Donald H. Patterson, former publisher of The (Baltimore) Sun and president of the A.S. Abell Co., died Dec. 2, 1997.

She was the sister of the late Judge Ridgely P. Melvin Jr., Augusta Melvin Torgerson and Mary Melvin Clark.

Surviving are two sons, Donald H. Patterson Jr. of Virginia Beach, Va., and Timothy C. Patterson of Annapolis; two daughters, Elizabeth P. Langslet of Montvale, N.J., and Susan P. Davis of Annapolis; one brother, John B. Melvin of North Carolina; 14 grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren.

Funeral services will be at 2 p.m. Monday at St. Anne’s Episcopal Church, 199 Duke of Gloucester St. Burial will follow in Christ Church Cemetery in West River.

Memorial contributions, in lieu of flowers, can be made to Hospice of the Chesapeake, 8424 Veterans Highway, Millersville, MD 21108.