The Hayes Family History Site

Including Members Of The Hayes, Tierney, Lewis, Beattie, Sheehan, Yerks, Condos, Smith and Other Families

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JEREMIAH D SHEEHAN & FAMILY

Jeremiah D Sheehan was born March 17, 1827 in County Kerry, Ireland.  According to immigration records Jeremiah arrived in Boston on June 7, 1846 and applied for naturalization on January 18, 1859.  He was married to Mary Sullivan, who was born circa 1829 in Ireland. There is no indication as to whether they were married before or after his immigration to America, although “after” seems more likely.

Around 1860, Jeremiah had moved his family from the outskirts of Manchester into the main city.  Over the next few decades, they lived in several houses in Manchester.

  • 1860:  6 Johnson’s Block
  • 1864 – 1866:   4 Mitchell’s Block
  • 1871 – 1875:  5 Merrimack (opposite the square)
  • 1873:  Rear of 44 Merrimack
  • 1875:   62 Auburn Street, Manchester, NH
  • 1877 – 1886:   62 Auburn Street, Manchester, NH
  • 1886 – 1891:  186 Auburn Street, Manchester, NH

Jeremiah D Sheehan was a proud member of several New Hampshire Volunteer Regiments during the civil war. He enlisted as a Private on 25 July 1861 at the age of 38.  His grave proudly indicates that he was a member of Co. K of the10th Regiment of the New Hampshire Volunteers. His Civil War history is as follows:

  • Enlisted in Company C, 3rd Infantry Regiment New Hampshire on 23 Aug 1861.
  • Received a disability discharge from Company C, 3rd Infantry Regiment New Hampshire on 19 Oct 1861 at Annapolis, MD.
  • Enlisted in Company K, 10th Infantry Regiment New Hampshire on 5 Sep 1862.
  • Received a disability discharge from Company K, 10th Infantry Regiment New Hampshire on 28 Apr 1863.
  • Enlisted in Company C, 11th Regiment U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps on 4 Jan 1864.
  • Received a final disability discharge from Company C, 11th Regiment U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps on 2 Dec 1864 at Point Lookout, MD.

In August of 1870, Jeremiah was treated at the U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in Kennebec, Maine for his hernia that he developed during the Civil War.  It is not known how long he remained there.

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Abt. Tuesday, September 8th, 1906
Either, Manchester Union or The Ledger

Unconscious At His Post

John J Hayes Was Stricken With Apoplexy and Died

John J Hayes, a nightwatchman in the stocking mill in Amoskeag was found unconscious in the mill at 1 o’clock Monday morning, and died at 9 o’clock. The cause of the death was an apoplectic shock. Mr. Hayes was as well as ever on Sunday. He attended church as usual, at St. Patrick’s, and went to his work, apparently in good health.

Mr. Hayes was formally one of the most popular men of the South End. He was a graduate of the old Park Street school, and Bryant & Stratton Business College, and years ago was a principal of a night school.

He was a native of England and was 54 years of age. He lived at 35 Front St., Amoskeag. Mrs. Hayes survives him, and other survivors are a son, Jeremiah Hayes; and a daughter, Jenny Hayes, both of this city.

 

John J Hayes Found Unconscious

Thursday, May 10, 1906
Manchester Union
Page 4

John J Hayes

The funeral service of John J Hayes was held at St. Patrick’s Church on Wednesday morning, the Rev. Father Matthew Kramer celebrating a high mass of Requiem at 830 o’clock, assisted by the church choir. Interment was at St. Joseph’s Cemetery, where Father Creamer read the last prayers. Kean & Sheehan were the undertakers. J Arthur Kennedy was the Funeral Director, and the pallbearers were Patrick J Flynn, William J Kennedy, Michael Connor, Thomas Fahey and John F Sullivan.

In attendance from out of town were Mr. and Mrs. H A Fenner, Ms. Jenny Kelty and Mrs. Margaret Flynn of Providence Rhode Island; William H Hickey of Boston, and Mr. and Mrs. RH Hickey of Fitchburg, Mass.

The flowers were as follows: Pillow “Papa.” family; wreath of galax, Bert and Ella Tenner of Providence, R. I.; Standing wreath, “sleep” on base, Mr. and Mrs. John F Sullivan; standing crescent, “John,” an old-time friend, P J. Flynn; crescent, Joseph J Hayes; pinks, Walter S Holt; cut flowers, neighbors; pinks, William Burke and family; pinks, S. L. Flanders and family; standing cross, “rest,” and pinks, Manchester Stocking Company; pinks, Henry Dinnan and family; pinks, Nelllie Kilty; spiritual bouquet, Minnie McCarthy.

 

John J Hayes Obituary

The Funeral of Thomas E Hayes

September 17, 2013

Monday, September 21, 1897
Manchester Union
Page 4

Funeral of Thomas E Hayes

The remains of Thomas E Hayes were removed from the family residence, 30 Second St., to the Cathedral Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, where the funeral services were held, the Rev. Father Hennon officiating. The internment took place in the family lot in St. Joseph’s Cemetery, and the prayers were read by the Rev. Father Brennan. The bearers were Arthur Kennedy, Walter Kennedy, John Ryan, Hervey Hayes, Freddie Gelinas and Peter Gelinas . The grave was covered with amount of floral tributes, including the following; Pillow, from the family; crosses, from Mr. and Mrs. William Howe and Mr. and Mrs. W H Hickey; star, Nellie Kilty; Crescent, the Misses Kennedy; 25 pinks, a friend; cluster of astors, Kittie Howe, Nellie and Sarah Donovan, Johnnie Ryan, Mr. and Mrs. J T Desmond and Annie Lynch; baskets, Hattie Sullivan and Mrs. F W Hart, and bouquets from Ida and Emma Tardy, Mr. and Mrs. George L Stearns, Mrs. John Horrigan, Mrs. Catherine Horrigan, Mrs. Edward Harrington, Hervey, Emma and Willie Hayes, Grace Robinson, Gracie Ayer, Mary Davis, Alfreda Balch, Freddie and Lucy Copson, Ernest and Frank Copson, Mrs. John Edgerly, Fred Linen, Richard Kane and wife, Mrs. William Burke, Fred and Rosie Lawrence, Jere Desmond, Minnie and Willie McCarthy, Annie Dyson, Eve McLean, Master Wingate, Mrs. T W Robinson, Mrs. Clagg??, Mrs. Goshen and Mrs. Stone. The funeral was under the direction of William F Kennedy with T F Collins undertaker.

 

Thomas Hayes Obituary

Monday, August 1, 1927
The Union, City Editor 
Page 11


Mrs. Jane B. Hayes

Mrs. Jane B (Keilty) Hayes, a resident of Manchester for 70 years, died early Sunday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Harry McNeil at 266 Goffstown Road, after a short illness. She was a native of Manchester, England. Mrs. Hayes lived most of her life in St. Anne’s parish where her family was one of the pioneers. At her death, she held membership in the Church Debt Society of St. Patrick’s Church from which place the funeral will be held. Her survivors are one son, Jeremiah J Hayes, one daughter Mrs. Harry McNeil, three sisters, Mrs. Rose Kennedy, Ms. Ellen Keilty and Mrs. Sarah Howe and four grandchildren, all of the city.

Jane B Hayes Death Notice

Jane B (Keilty) Hayes Obituary

September 17, 2013

Monday, August 2, 1927
The Leader (City Edition)
Page 12, Col 7
Mrs Jane B Hayes
The funeral of Mrs. Jane B Hayes took place Tuesday afternoon from the family home, 266 Gofftstown Road. Sorrowing relatives and friends assembled at St. Patrick’s Church where at 9 o’clock, Rev. Joseph R O’Connor celebrated a high mass of Requiem assisted by the Requiem choir. The bearers were six nephews, Walter J Kennedy, J Arthur Kennedy, Albert J Howe, William Howe, John E Cuddy and Joseph Hickey. Those present from other places were Joseph Hickey and Frank Cuddy, Fitchburg, Massachusetts; Mr. and Mrs. William Donovan; Mr. and Mrs. William Flynn, Providence; Mr. and Mrs. John Leahey; Albert and John Leahey Junior, Claremont. Under the direction of Charles McKeon burial was made in the family lot at St. Joseph’s Cemetery, where the committal service was conducted by Rev. Joseph R O’Connor. Joseph M McDonough and company had charge of the funeral arrangements.

Jane B Hayes Death Notice

Isaac Yerks was born circa 1823 to John Van Tassel and Fanny Yerks in New Castle, New York. He was the first of nine children born to them.

Somewhere in the mid-1850s, Isaac married a woman by the name of Elizabeth and began their family, living in the town of Mount Pleasant near other Yerks relatives.

Ezra Yerks, Isaacs younger brother was born circa 1830 and does not appear to have ever married.

On July 4, 1856 Isaac and Elizabeth gave birth to their first child, Charles W. Yerks.

In April of 1869, Issac and Elizabeth Yerks moved to the Tarrytown area of Mount Pleasant and set up residence in Isaac Van Wart Buckhout’s house. A move that he would undoubtably regret. Issac worked on Buckhouts farm for shares. According to the 1870 United States Census record, Ezra Yerks was also living with them in Mount Pleasant. Isaac Van Wert Buckhout was a wealthy man, an accomplished violinist, and a reportedly a misogynist who brooded over the perversity of women. He lived in his Sleepy Hollow Road home with his wife Louisa Ann, who owned the house in which they resided.

On New Years day, the normally quit and reserve Tarrytown village was rocked with the news that two of its citizens had been brutally murdered. Louisa Ann and Alfred Rendall, a wholesale liquor dealer from New York City, were found dead in the Buckhout home. Alfred was fatally shot in the head. Luisa and was killed with blunt force trauma to the face using the same rifle that was used to kill Alfred Rendall. Rendall’s son Charles, was also seriously injured with a bullet wound to the eye.

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Sample Timeline

April 12, 2013

In my quest to acquire all things that are historic in nature and related to the Yerks family, I found the postcard below on eBay.  I was able to purchase it for just $3.50.  Although G.W. Yerks is not a direct relative of Colleen’s, he is a distant cousin.

GW Yerks 1

GW Yerks 2

George W. Yerks was born at Unionville (now Hawthorne), New York on February 4, 1848. He died in Albany on August 9, 1903.  He was the son of William H. and Mary A. (Clark) Yerks. George  was educated at Amenia and finished his education at Claverack Academy. After graduation he became employed by the United States government. He then went to Albany and established himself in the fancy grocery business on Broadway, under the firm name of Benjamin & Yerks. In 1877 he became a sole proprietor.

Dissolution of Benjamin & Yerks Company

Dissolution of Benjamin & Yerks Company.  
The Albany Daily Evening Times; May 15, 1877

But in 1878, just one year later,  he admitted a new partner under the firm name of George W. Yerks & Company. He held offices of honor and trust in the city; was trustee of the Madison Avenue Reformed Church and a member of the Fort Orange Club. On July 8, 1868, he married Adaline Maria, who was born in Cleveland, Ohio and died in Albany on October 30, 1900. Adeline was the daughter of George Whitman and Adaline (Powell) Benjamin.

Source: Genealogical and Family History of Southern New York and the Hudson River Valley”, volume III

Nathaniel, son of John, was born about 1808, Somers, Westchester County, New York and resided in the town of New Castle, where he was a successful farmer, and died at the age of 18 years. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and a Democrat in political allegiance. He married Sarah Ann Weeks, born in the town of Somers, daughter of William and Rachel Weeks, representatives of old Westchester families, and she like himself was a faithful member of the Methodist church, and died at the age of 70 years. They were the parents of nine children: John, died at the age of 21 years; Cornelius, lived in Mount Kisco; Anna, wife of unknown Ferguson, resided in the same place; Cyrus, lived in goldens Bridge, Westchester County, New York; George Washington, lived in Dutchess County, New York; Stephen; Julia; Nathaniel, mentioned below; Araminta, died at the age of 19 years. Three of the sons were Union soldiers in the Civil War, participating in many battles. They were Cyrus, George W. And Nathaniel, all members of the Fifth New York heavy artillery, the second being a sergeant.

Nathaniel, six son of Nathaniel and Sarah A (Weeks) Cutler, was born December 21, 1844, in New Castle. He grew to manhood on the paternal farm, aiding in its labors and attending the local schools. He was still a minor when he entered the military service in the Civil War, and was stationed most of the time in Virginia, being honorably discharged at Harpers Ferry. He attained the rank of Corporal in Company H, Fifth New York Heavy Artillery, under Col. Graham, and participated in all the battles of the Shenandoah campaign under Gen. Sheridan. He resided for many years upon a farm of 72 acres in New Castle, most of which was under a high state of cultivation, having an orchard of 6 acres and excellent buildings, affording an ideal rural home.  It is located 2 miles from Mount Kisco. Mr. Cutler is a charter member of the Stewart Hart Post, Grand Army of the Republic, of Mount Kisco. He has been identified all his life with the Republican Party in politics. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, a public spirited and enterprising citizen, and has given warm support to all those offices calculated to advance the morale, intellectual or material welfare of the community in which he lived. He now resides with his elder son in Fallsburg, New York.

He married, December 28, 1870, Martha Ida Sutton, born, reared and educated at Claverack, Columbia County, New York and and represents an old and well-known family. Nathaniel Cutler and his wife have two sons: Walter S, mentioned below; William Edward, a farmer, and owner of 200 acres of land in Liberty, Sullivan County; he married, in 1901, at Mount Vernon.  Katherine Gettle, of Mount Vernon, New York, and they have two children: Madeline and Claire. Mrs. Cutler is descended from Joseph Sutton, a member of the society of friends, who came from Southern Court, England, and settled in Westchester County, New York, accompanied by his brother John. James, son of Joseph Sutton, was born in a log cabin on the paternal homestead in Westchester, and was the father of Walter Sutton, born in the same place, whose son, James T Sutton, was also born in the same place; he was a farmer by occupation, an active supporter of Democratic policies and died at the age of 79 years old. On reaching manhood he married his second cousin, Phebe, a member of the Society of Friends, who died at the age of 79 years, daughter of William Sutton, a son of Joseph Sutton, the pioneer. William Sutton married Charlotte Hunt, a daughter of Josiah and Lydia (Palmer) Hunt, who bore blood relation to Lord Effingham, of England. Their son, Joseph T Sutton, was the father of Martha Ida, wife of Nathaniel Cutler, and of William Edward Sutton, who lived in Seattle Washington, and was reared and educated in Westchester County, where he was for sometime a successful teacher and settled in the middle of his life in the West.  He married Emma, daughter of Benjamin Acker.

Walter Sutton, son of McDaniel and Martha I (Sutton) Cutler, was born February 5, 1874, in Peekskill, New York, where he grew to manhood. He was educated at Mount Kisco High School, where he graduated in 1892, and subsequently in engaged in surveying and civil engineering in Westchester County. In 1902 he removed to Liberty, Sullivan County, New York, where for eight years he was a lumber merchant.  In 1910, he removed to Fallsburg, and purchased a flour and grain business which he is conducting with gratifying success. Mr. Cutler is a charter member of Liberty Lodge, No. 728, Knights of the Maccabees, and is a member of the Society of Friends. He married in Liberty, December 27, 1900, Harriet E Major, born July 28, 1880, in Mount Vernon, New York, daughter of Gustav and Harriet (Ely) Major of that town. Mr. Major was a contracting carpenter and builder in Mount Vernon and an active participant in public affairs. He had children: Esther, Harriet E, Emily, Carrie and Gertrude. Children of Walter S Cutler: Dorothy, Roy, Florence; all students of the public school.